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鼓楼

Notes on China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and beyond…
Aug 30 '14
"The LSA [Linguistic Society of America] has learned from news reports published this week that Abduweli Ayup has been ordered to pay a large fine and continue his detention in a Chinese prison for the next six months. The LSA had sent a letter earlier this year to government officials in China and the U.S., seeking details about Abduweli’s alleged crimes, and legal intervention on his behalf, consistent with international covenants on human rights. Friends of Abduweli’s have established a fundraising page on the YouCaring website to assist in raising a portion of the $13,000 (USD) fine imposed by the Chinese government.”
For more, see “Uyghur Linguist Sentenced to 18-Month Prison Term in China" Linguistic Society of America.org.  (28 August 2014)

"The LSA [Linguistic Society of America] has learned from news reports published this week that Abduweli Ayup has been ordered to pay a large fine and continue his detention in a Chinese prison for the next six months. The LSA had sent a letter earlier this year to government officials in China and the U.S., seeking details about Abduweli’s alleged crimes, and legal intervention on his behalf, consistent with international covenants on human rights. Friends of Abduweli’s have established a fundraising page on the YouCaring website to assist in raising a portion of the $13,000 (USD) fine imposed by the Chinese government.”

For more, see “Uyghur Linguist Sentenced to 18-Month Prison Term in China" Linguistic Society of America.org.  (28 August 2014)

1 note Tags: China Xinjiang human rights

Aug 24 '14
"Chung Eun-yong ran to his wife and embraced her. She collapsed in his arms, sobbing. He asked and asked about their two young children, but she could not answer.
'At that moment, I realized what happened,' he said. 'And I knew I was never going to have another happy day in my life.'
What he had grasped was that his daughter and son were dead. He spent the rest of his life trying to find out how and why that had happened.”
For more, see Chung Eun-yong’s recent obituary, “Chung Eun-yong, 91, Dies; Helped Expose U.S. Killings of South Koreans,” in The New York Times (22 August 2014)
Image: Heesoon Yim / Associated Press

"Chung Eun-yong ran to his wife and embraced her. She collapsed in his arms, sobbing. He asked and asked about their two young children, but she could not answer.

'At that moment, I realized what happened,' he said. 'And I knew I was never going to have another happy day in my life.'

What he had grasped was that his daughter and son were dead. He spent the rest of his life trying to find out how and why that had happened.”

For more, see Chung Eun-yong’s recent obituary, “Chung Eun-yong, 91, Dies; Helped Expose U.S. Killings of South Koreans,” in The New York Times (22 August 2014)

Image: Heesoon Yim / Associated Press

8 notes Tags: South Korea United States obituaries Korean War

Aug 24 '14
"The Tsungli Yamen" - date 1889-1891, China.
From the collection of the National Archives, UK.
Via Flickr Commons (accessed 24 August 2014). Link.

"The Tsungli Yamen"
- date 1889-1891, China.

From the collection of the National Archives, UK.

Via Flickr Commons (accessed 24 August 2014). Link.

8 notes Tags: China history archives photography visual culture

Aug 22 '14
Alan Baumler reviews volume 3 of Understanding China through Comics by Jing Liu (2013). See the excellent Frog in a Well East Asian weblog here.

Alan Baumler reviews volume 3 of Understanding China through Comics by Jing Liu (2013). See the excellent Frog in a Well East Asian weblog here.

3 notes Tags: China history comics reviews

Aug 19 '14
Paul Pickowicz, author of China on Film: A Century of Exploration, Confrontation and Controversy (Rowman and Littlefield, 2013), is interviewed at China Digital Times. There, he shares “his experience studying Chinese cinema since the 1980s, mainland films that made an impact during key political upheavals, as well as his own thoughts on some of the most underrated and overrated films to come out of Mainland China during the past one hundred years.”
See Natalie Ornell, “Paul Pickowicz on a Century of Chinese Film,” China Digital Times (18 Aug 2014)

Paul Pickowicz, author of China on Film: A Century of Exploration, Confrontation and Controversy (Rowman and Littlefield, 2013), is interviewed at China Digital Times. There, he shares “his experience studying Chinese cinema since the 1980s, mainland films that made an impact during key political upheavals, as well as his own thoughts on some of the most underrated and overrated films to come out of Mainland China during the past one hundred years.”

See Natalie Ornell, “Paul Pickowicz on a Century of Chinese Film,” China Digital Times (18 Aug 2014)

3 notes Tags: China cinema history interviews books

Aug 19 '14
"At last week’s meeting of the Historical Society for Twentieth-Century China in Taipei, roughly 200 historians from Asia, the United States and Europe gathered to share their latest research. But during lunch hours and coffee breaks, the one question that kept popping up wasn’t about any given paper or project. Instead it was: ‘How’s your archival access been lately?’"
For more on China’s efforts to limit access to historical archives, see Maura Cunningham, “Denying Historians: China’s Archives Increasingly Off-Bounds,” The Wall Street Journal (19 August 2014)
Image: Zuma Press

"At last week’s meeting of the Historical Society for Twentieth-Century China in Taipei, roughly 200 historians from Asia, the United States and Europe gathered to share their latest research. But during lunch hours and coffee breaks, the one question that kept popping up wasn’t about any given paper or project. Instead it was: ‘How’s your archival access been lately?’"

For more on China’s efforts to limit access to historical archives, see Maura Cunningham, “Denying Historians: China’s Archives Increasingly Off-Bounds,” The Wall Street Journal (19 August 2014)

Image: Zuma Press

4 notes Tags: China censorship history scholarship

Aug 12 '14
“Simon Leys Remembered" — A ChinaFile Conversation with Isabel Hilton, Perry Link, and Ian Buruma. (11 Aug 2014). For Simon Leys (Pierre Ryckmans) obituary, see this link.
Image: William West / AFP / Getty Images

Simon Leys Remembered" — A ChinaFile Conversation with Isabel Hilton, Perry Link, and Ian Buruma. (11 Aug 2014). For Simon Leys (Pierre Ryckmans) obituary, see this link.

Image: William West / AFP / Getty Images

4 notes Tags: obituraries China

Aug 3 '14

Aug 3 '14
"South Korea plans to publish a white paper on women forced into sexual slavery by Japan’s military during World War II., the first such report in more than two decades that may fuel tensions between the North Asian neighbors.
The report, to be published next year, will be a comprehensive compilation and analysis of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery crimes and the damage done to the victims, Seoul’s Ministry of Gender Equality & Family said Sunday.”
For more, see In-Soo Nam, “South Korea to Publish White Paper on Japan Sex Slaves,” The Wall Street Journal (3 August 2014)
Image: Associated Press

"South Korea plans to publish a white paper on women forced into sexual slavery by Japan’s military during World War II., the first such report in more than two decades that may fuel tensions between the North Asian neighbors.

The report, to be published next year, will be a comprehensive compilation and analysis of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery crimes and the damage done to the victims, Seoul’s Ministry of Gender Equality & Family said Sunday.”

For more, see In-Soo Nam, “South Korea to Publish White Paper on Japan Sex Slaves,” The Wall Street Journal (3 August 2014)

Image: Associated Press

20 notes Tags: South Korea Japan comfort women Asia Pacific War

Aug 3 '14
Tong Zhiwei on “How we might summarize the lessons of the Zhou Yongkang case” (1 August 2014). Link:
童之伟:我们该怎样总结周永康案的教训
Tong Zhiwei is Professor of Law at Shanghai’s East China University of Political Science and Law. 
(via Chris Buckley)

Tong Zhiwei on “How we might summarize the lessons of the Zhou Yongkang case” (1 August 2014). Link:

童之伟:我们该怎样总结周永康案的教训

Tong Zhiwei is Professor of Law at Shanghai’s East China University of Political Science and Law.

(via Chris Buckley)

4 notes Tags: China politics corruption law

Aug 3 '14
"Friday evening television viewers in Wenzhou, a city in eastern Zhejiang province, saw their normal programming interrupted by anti-Communist Party messages.
One message, emblazoned across the top of the screen, declared, ‘Damn the Chinese Communist Party’s mouthpieces: China Central Television, Peoples’ Daily’ — the first a broadcaster, the latter a newspaper, and both generally acknowledged to toe the party line — as well as ‘the Propaganda Department and the State Radio and Film Administration,’ both agencies that exercise government censorship. Another message, placed in the lower left-hand corner of the screen, called for the release of Wang Bingzhang, a pro-democracy activist who has been detained in China since 2003, and declared that ‘the Communist bandits are the real criminals.’”
For more on the story, see Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian and Isaac Stone Fish, “Exclusive: Hackers Infiltrate Chinese TV Station,” at Foreign Policy (1 August 2014)
Image: freeweibo.com / Fair Use

"Friday evening television viewers in Wenzhou, a city in eastern Zhejiang province, saw their normal programming interrupted by anti-Communist Party messages.

One message, emblazoned across the top of the screen, declared, ‘Damn the Chinese Communist Party’s mouthpieces: China Central Television, Peoples’ Daily’ — the first a broadcaster, the latter a newspaper, and both generally acknowledged to toe the party line — as well as ‘the Propaganda Department and the State Radio and Film Administration,’ both agencies that exercise government censorship. Another message, placed in the lower left-hand corner of the screen, called for the release of Wang Bingzhang, a pro-democracy activist who has been detained in China since 2003, and declared that ‘the Communist bandits are the real criminals.’”

For more on the story, see Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian and Isaac Stone Fish, “Exclusive: Hackers Infiltrate Chinese TV Station,” at Foreign Policy (1 August 2014)

Image: freeweibo.com / Fair Use

4 notes Tags: China internet social media censorship

Jul 31 '14
"Actor James Shigeta played the leading male role in the lavish movie musical "Flower Drum Song" in 1961. The year before, he won a Golden Globe as most promising newcomer.
But after “Flower Drum Song” he never again played the leading man in a major film.
'He was so handsome, debonair,' said actor James Hong, who appeared in several films and TV shows with Shigeta. 'But there was the stigma in Hollywood about Asian leading men.'
For the full obit, see David Colker, “James Shigeta Dies at 85; Starred in ‘Flower Drum Song’, ‘Die Hard’” LA Times (29 July 2014). See also his New York Times obituary, here.
Image: UCLA Film and Television Archive

"Actor James Shigeta played the leading male role in the lavish movie musical "Flower Drum Song" in 1961. The year before, he won a Golden Globe as most promising newcomer.

But after “Flower Drum Song” he never again played the leading man in a major film.

'He was so handsome, debonair,' said actor James Hong, who appeared in several films and TV shows with Shigeta. 'But there was the stigma in Hollywood about Asian leading men.'

For the full obit, see David Colker, “James Shigeta Dies at 85; Starred in ‘Flower Drum Song’, ‘Die Hard’” LA Times (29 July 2014). See also his New York Times obituary, here.

Image: UCLA Film and Television Archive

14 notes Tags: obituaries cinema Asian American

Jul 31 '14
"President Xi Jinping’s campaign against corruption among the Chinese elite took public aim on Tuesday at its biggest target so far, when the Communist Party announced an investigation of Zhou Yongkang, the former chief of domestic security.
Mr. Zhou, who retired from the Politburo Standing Committee in 2012, accumulated vast power while in office, and his family became enormously wealthy. Now, according to the terse announcement by the party’s anticorruption agency, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, he is being investigated ‘on suspicion of grave violations of discipline.’”
For more, see Chris Buckley and Andrew Jacobs, “China Says Former Security Chief is Being Investigated for Corruption,” New York Times (29 July 2014)
Image: Jason Lee / Reuters

"President Xi Jinping’s campaign against corruption among the Chinese elite took public aim on Tuesday at its biggest target so far, when the Communist Party announced an investigation of Zhou Yongkang, the former chief of domestic security.

Mr. Zhou, who retired from the Politburo Standing Committee in 2012, accumulated vast power while in office, and his family became enormously wealthy. Now, according to the terse announcement by the party’s anticorruption agency, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, he is being investigated ‘on suspicion of grave violations of discipline.’”

For more, see Chris Buckley and Andrew Jacobs, “China Says Former Security Chief is Being Investigated for Corruption,” New York Times (29 July 2014)

Image: Jason Lee / Reuters

5 notes Tags: China

Jul 28 '14
"With a set of chopsticks in her hands and a Tibetan prayer spilling from her lips, Gelazomo, a 32-year-old yak herder, hunched over the rocky banks of the river that cuts through this city and hunted for the quarry that she hoped would bring salvation.
Every few minutes, she would tease out a tiny river shrimp that had become stranded in the mud, and then dropping it into a bucket of water. Beside her, dozens of other Tibetans toiled in the noonday sun, among them small children and old people who, from afar, appeared to be panning for gold.
'Buddha has taught us that treating others with love and compassion is the right thing to do, no matter how tiny that life is,' she explained, as the newly revived crustaceans darted through the water of her bucket.”
For more, see Andrew Jacobs, “In Scarred Chinese Tibetan City, Devotion to the Sanctity of Life,” New York Times (25 July 2014)
Image: Gilles Sabrie for the New York Times

"With a set of chopsticks in her hands and a Tibetan prayer spilling from her lips, Gelazomo, a 32-year-old yak herder, hunched over the rocky banks of the river that cuts through this city and hunted for the quarry that she hoped would bring salvation.

Every few minutes, she would tease out a tiny river shrimp that had become stranded in the mud, and then dropping it into a bucket of water. Beside her, dozens of other Tibetans toiled in the noonday sun, among them small children and old people who, from afar, appeared to be panning for gold.

'Buddha has taught us that treating others with love and compassion is the right thing to do, no matter how tiny that life is,' she explained, as the newly revived crustaceans darted through the water of her bucket.”

For more, see Andrew Jacobs, “In Scarred Chinese Tibetan City, Devotion to the Sanctity of Life,” New York Times (25 July 2014)

Image: Gilles Sabrie for the New York Times

243 notes Tags: Tibet environment human rights

Jul 28 '14
"The mainland’s business authorities are investigating the offices of Microsoft Corp, the US technology giant has confirmed.
The State Administration for Industry and Commerce sent its investigators to the company’s offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Chengdu today for an official investigation.
It is unclear why the company is being looked into.”
For more, including detail on the PRC’s ban of government use of the Windows 8 operating system last May, see Adrian Wan and Keith Zhai, “Microsoft China Placed Under Official Investigation as Offices in Four Cities Raided,” South China Morning Post (28 July 2014)
Image: AP

"The mainland’s business authorities are investigating the offices of Microsoft Corp, the US technology giant has confirmed.

The State Administration for Industry and Commerce sent its investigators to the company’s offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Chengdu today for an official investigation.

It is unclear why the company is being looked into.”

For more, including detail on the PRC’s ban of government use of the Windows 8 operating system last May, see Adrian Wan and Keith Zhai, “Microsoft China Placed Under Official Investigation as Offices in Four Cities Raided,” South China Morning Post (28 July 2014)

Image: AP

7 notes Tags: China business technology