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鼓楼

Notes on China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and beyond…
Sep 30 '14
"A week ago today I sat together with you outside the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s library, a teacher among other teachers, a university member beside students, 13,000 strong. The weeks before had felt quiet: at the three previous all-student meetings around the Goddess of Democracy statue, you listened respectfully to guest speakers—past student union presidents, a student who had been arrested on July 1, Leung ‘Longhair’ Kwok-hung from the League of Social Democrats. There were not many of you, but you raised your hands and made gentle suggestions about what time last Monday’s rally should start, about how you could be photographed studying outside of class, about making public art by folding paper stars.
So I was surprised when I arrived at the campus plaza on Monday. Under a relentless late summer sun, you filled the entire campus mall. On the impromptu stage, white banners read, ‘Student Boycott, Take a Stand!’ and ‘Be the master of Hong Kong’s future!’”
For more, see Denise Y. Ho, “Against My Fear, I See That You Hope: A Professor’s Open Letter to Her Students" ChinaFile (29 Sept 2014)
Image: Lam Yik Fei / Getty Images

"A week ago today I sat together with you outside the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s library, a teacher among other teachers, a university member beside students, 13,000 strong. The weeks before had felt quiet: at the three previous all-student meetings around the Goddess of Democracy statue, you listened respectfully to guest speakers—past student union presidents, a student who had been arrested on July 1, Leung ‘Longhair’ Kwok-hung from the League of Social Democrats. There were not many of you, but you raised your hands and made gentle suggestions about what time last Monday’s rally should start, about how you could be photographed studying outside of class, about making public art by folding paper stars.

So I was surprised when I arrived at the campus plaza on Monday. Under a relentless late summer sun, you filled the entire campus mall. On the impromptu stage, white banners read, ‘Student Boycott, Take a Stand!’ and ‘Be the master of Hong Kong’s future!’”

For more, see Denise Y. Ho, “Against My Fear, I See That You Hope: A Professor’s Open Letter to Her Students" ChinaFile (29 Sept 2014)

Image: Lam Yik Fei / Getty Images

21 notes Tags: Hong Kong protests democracy China

Sep 30 '14
Interested in perceptions of the Hong Kong democracy protests as seen among people living in mainland China?
See Christina Larson, “Not Even the Great Firewall Can Shut Out News About Hong Kong’s Democracy Protests,” Bloomberg Businessweek (29 Sept 2014)
Image: Lam Yik Fei / Bloomberg
h/t Jeff Wasserstrom

Interested in perceptions of the Hong Kong democracy protests as seen among people living in mainland China?

See Christina Larson, “Not Even the Great Firewall Can Shut Out News About Hong Kong’s Democracy Protests,” Bloomberg Businessweek (29 Sept 2014)

Image: Lam Yik Fei / Bloomberg

h/t Jeff Wasserstrom

10 notes Tags: Hong Kong protests democracy China

Sep 30 '14
"Occupy Central organisers said they’d need about 10,000 supporters to shut down Hong Kong’s financial district before the movement was officially launched at 1.45am on Sunday.
Tens of thousands of protesters have since taken to the streets, paralysing not just Central but also parts of Causeway Bay, Admiralty and Mong Kok.
As we enter the third day of the movement, SCMP.com takes a look back at some of the highlights of the protests so far.”
See James Griffiths, “Top 10 Highlights of Occupy Central So Far,” South China Morning Post (30 Sept 2014)
Image: SCMP

"Occupy Central organisers said they’d need about 10,000 supporters to shut down Hong Kong’s financial district before the movement was officially launched at 1.45am on Sunday.

Tens of thousands of protesters have since taken to the streets, paralysing not just Central but also parts of Causeway Bay, Admiralty and Mong Kok.

As we enter the third day of the movement, SCMP.com takes a look back at some of the highlights of the protests so far.”

See James Griffiths, “Top 10 Highlights of Occupy Central So Far,” South China Morning Post (30 Sept 2014)

Image: SCMP

9 notes Tags: Hong Kong democracy protests China

Sep 29 '14
"Overnight, my childhood home became a battleground. The Hong Kong streets where I grew up morphed into an alarming political flash point with riot police in gas masks firing tear-gas canisters at pro-democracy protesters, many of them defending themselves from the noxious white clouds with little more than umbrellas and plastic wrap.
Having lived for years in Beijing researching the legacy of China’s suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, I should not have been shocked.”
Louisa Lim, author of The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited, shares an op-ed at the New York Times today on the current protests in Hong Kong. For full text, see Louisa Lim, “Hong Kong People!" NYT (29 Sept 2014)
Image: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

"Overnight, my childhood home became a battleground. The Hong Kong streets where I grew up morphed into an alarming political flash point with riot police in gas masks firing tear-gas canisters at pro-democracy protesters, many of them defending themselves from the noxious white clouds with little more than umbrellas and plastic wrap.

Having lived for years in Beijing researching the legacy of China’s suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, I should not have been shocked.”

Louisa Lim, author of The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited, shares an op-ed at the New York Times today on the current protests in Hong Kong. For full text, see Louisa Lim, “Hong Kong People!" NYT (29 Sept 2014)

Image: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

15 notes Tags: Hong Kong democracy protests China human rights commentary

Sep 28 '14

5 notes Tags: Hong Kong democracy protest China civil disobedience video

Sep 28 '14
Wondering what are the roots of this protest?The issues that are driving it?
See “What is Hong Kong’s Occupy Central Movement?" at BBC News (21 Sept 2014)
Image: Getty Images

Wondering what are the roots of this protest?The issues that are driving it?

See “What is Hong Kong’s Occupy Central Movement?" at BBC News (21 Sept 2014)

Image: Getty Images

81 notes Tags: Hong Kong protest democracy civil disobedience China

Sep 28 '14

Live Coverage of Hong Kong Protests - YouTube Link

4 notes Tags: Hong Kong protest civil disobedience China democracy

Sep 28 '14
Hong Kong police pepper spray protesters. Via Alvin KM Chan and Andrew Peng (@TheAPJournalist). Link: http://pbs.twimg.com/media/ByijP4pCEAEJpNH.jpg:large

Hong Kong police pepper spray protesters. Via Alvin KM Chan and Andrew Peng (@TheAPJournalist). Link: http://pbs.twimg.com/media/ByijP4pCEAEJpNH.jpg:large

12 notes Tags: Hong Kong protest civil disobedience democracy China

Sep 28 '14
From Hong Kong, the South China Morning Post reports that: “Police fired tear gas and launched baton charges in an attempt to disperse a huge mass of protesters as they tried to join Occupy Central’s main protest site.
Witnesses said at least six rounds of teargas were fired into Harcourt Road, where thousands of protesters had massed in an effort to enter the main protest site at Tamar Park.
Earlier attempts to disperse the crowd with pepper spray were unsuccessful as protesters, many armed with umbrellas to protect themselves, clashed with police.”
For more on the story, see “Police Fire Tear Gas and Baton Charge Thousands of Occupy Protesters”, South China Morning Post (28 Sept 2014)
Image: K. Y. Cheng

From Hong Kong, the South China Morning Post reports that: “Police fired tear gas and launched baton charges in an attempt to disperse a huge mass of protesters as they tried to join Occupy Central’s main protest site.

Witnesses said at least six rounds of teargas were fired into Harcourt Road, where thousands of protesters had massed in an effort to enter the main protest site at Tamar Park.

Earlier attempts to disperse the crowd with pepper spray were unsuccessful as protesters, many armed with umbrellas to protect themselves, clashed with police.”

For more on the story, see “Police Fire Tear Gas and Baton Charge Thousands of Occupy Protesters”, South China Morning Post (28 Sept 2014)

Image: K. Y. Cheng

143 notes Tags: Hong Kong protest democracy civil disobedience China

Sep 28 '14
"Pro-democracy clashes escalated in Hong Kong on Sunday as the police unleashed tear gas in an effort to clear thousands of protesters who have besieged the city government for three days.
The Chinese government condemned the demonstration. But by confronting the protesters in a bid to appease the Chinese Communist Party, the Hong Kong authorities could risk angering even more city residents, experts said.”
For more, see Chris Buckley and Alan Wong, “Police Unleash Tear Gas in Hong Kong Protests,” The New York Times (28 Sept 2014)
Image: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

"Pro-democracy clashes escalated in Hong Kong on Sunday as the police unleashed tear gas in an effort to clear thousands of protesters who have besieged the city government for three days.

The Chinese government condemned the demonstration. But by confronting the protesters in a bid to appease the Chinese Communist Party, the Hong Kong authorities could risk angering even more city residents, experts said.”

For more, see Chris Buckley and Alan Wong, “Police Unleash Tear Gas in Hong Kong Protests,” The New York Times (28 Sept 2014)

Image: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

5 notes Tags: Hong Kong democracy protest China civil disobedience

Sep 27 '14
"In other words, Tohti was actually guilty of running what readers around the world would instantly recognize as a blog. To be more precise, it was what Internet scholars like Ethan Zuckerman call a ‘bridge blog,’ one devoted, in the words of Zuckerman, to ‘building connections between people from different cultures via … online work.’”
The punishment? A sentence of life in prison.
For more on the recent story of Ilham Tohti, and its implications, see David Wertime, “An Internet Where Nobody Says Anything: Ilham Tohti’s Sentence Shows a Dark Vision for the Web of the Future,” Tea Leaf Nation / China File (25 Sept 2014)
Image: Goh Chai Hin / AFP / Getty Images

"In other words, Tohti was actually guilty of running what readers around the world would instantly recognize as a blog. To be more precise, it was what Internet scholars like Ethan Zuckerman call a ‘bridge blog,’ one devoted, in the words of Zuckerman, to ‘building connections between people from different cultures via … online work.’”

The punishment? A sentence of life in prison.

For more on the recent story of Ilham Tohti, and its implications, see David Wertime, “An Internet Where Nobody Says Anything: Ilham Tohti’s Sentence Shows a Dark Vision for the Web of the Future,” Tea Leaf Nation / China File (25 Sept 2014)

Image: Goh Chai Hin / AFP / Getty Images

3 notes Tags: China internet blogging human rights law internet freedom analysis media Xinjiang

Sep 26 '14
Indiana University released a strong statement on Sept. 24th protesting the conviction and life sentence given to Uighur scholar Ilham Tohti. Tohti was first arrested in Beijing on his way to to Indiana University, Bloomington, in 2013, where he was to serve as a visiting scholar. His daughter, Jewher Ilham, also currently attends Indiana University.
For the full statement, see “Statement from Indiana University on the Arrest and Conviction of Uighur Scholar Ilham Tohti,” Indiana University Newsroom (24 Sept 2014).

Indiana University released a strong statement on Sept. 24th protesting the conviction and life sentence given to Uighur scholar Ilham Tohti. Tohti was first arrested in Beijing on his way to to Indiana University, Bloomington, in 2013, where he was to serve as a visiting scholar. His daughter, Jewher Ilham, also currently attends Indiana University.

For the full statement, see “Statement from Indiana University on the Arrest and Conviction of Uighur Scholar Ilham Tohti,” Indiana University Newsroom (24 Sept 2014).

Tags: China human rights law Xinjiang

Sep 23 '14
"Taiwan is getting ready to host its first International Queer Film Festival which organizers say is an endeavor to showcase LGBT themes to the Taiwanese people as well as highlight awareness about issues the community faces, reports GayAsiaNews.com.”
For more, see “Taiwan to Host Its First International Queer Film Festival,” San Diego LGBT Weekly (22 Sept 2014)

"Taiwan is getting ready to host its first International Queer Film Festival which organizers say is an endeavor to showcase LGBT themes to the Taiwanese people as well as highlight awareness about issues the community faces, reports GayAsiaNews.com.

For more, see “Taiwan to Host Its First International Queer Film Festival,” San Diego LGBT Weekly (22 Sept 2014)

3 notes Tags: Taiwan cinema lgbtq

Sep 23 '14
"In my series of interviews with Chinese intellectuals, there is an empty chair for Ilham Tohti, the economist and Uighur activist. It’s not that I hadn’t heard of him or hadn’t been in China long enough to have met him before he was arrested earlier this year. I had, but foolishly had put off pursuing a meeting, thinking that of all the people who might be snapped up by the authorities, he was the least likely. We had many mutual friends and I knew him to oppose independence for Xinjiang, the giant, sparsely populated province in China’s far west that is now the source of a serious terrorism problem. Even though Ilham Tohti is a fierce critic of the government and often followed by state security agents, I didn’t think the forty-four-year-old professor at Beijing’s Minzu University would be lumped in with those who want independence for China’s minority regions.
I was wrong.”
For the full story, including interviews with prominent intellectuals sharing their thoughts on Ilham Tohti and his trial, see Ian Johnson, “They Don’t Want Moderate Uighurs,” The New York Review of Books (22 Sept 2014).
Image: Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty Images

"In my series of interviews with Chinese intellectuals, there is an empty chair for Ilham Tohti, the economist and Uighur activist. It’s not that I hadn’t heard of him or hadn’t been in China long enough to have met him before he was arrested earlier this year. I had, but foolishly had put off pursuing a meeting, thinking that of all the people who might be snapped up by the authorities, he was the least likely. We had many mutual friends and I knew him to oppose independence for Xinjiang, the giant, sparsely populated province in China’s far west that is now the source of a serious terrorism problem. Even though Ilham Tohti is a fierce critic of the government and often followed by state security agents, I didn’t think the forty-four-year-old professor at Beijing’s Minzu University would be lumped in with those who want independence for China’s minority regions.

I was wrong.”

For the full story, including interviews with prominent intellectuals sharing their thoughts on Ilham Tohti and his trial, see Ian Johnson, “They Don’t Want Moderate Uighurs,” The New York Review of Books (22 Sept 2014).

Image: Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty Images

7 notes Tags: China human rights law interviews commentary

Sep 23 '14
"A university professor who has become the most visible symbol of peaceful resistance by ethnic Uighurs to Chinese policies was sentenced to life in prison on Tuesday after being found guilty of separatism by court officials in the western region of Xinjiang, which Uighurs consider their homeland."
For more, see Edward Wong, “China Court Sentences Uighur Scholar to Life in Separatism Case,” The New York Times (23 Sept 2014). More can also be found in coverage at The Wall Street Journal , the BBC, and the South China Morning Post.
Image: Andy Wong / Associated Press

"A university professor who has become the most visible symbol of peaceful resistance by ethnic Uighurs to Chinese policies was sentenced to life in prison on Tuesday after being found guilty of separatism by court officials in the western region of Xinjiang, which Uighurs consider their homeland."

For more, see Edward Wong, “China Court Sentences Uighur Scholar to Life in Separatism Case,” The New York Times (23 Sept 2014). More can also be found in coverage at The Wall Street Journal , the BBC, and the South China Morning Post.

Image: Andy Wong / Associated Press

4 notes Tags: China human rights law Xinjiang